HomeNewsArticle Display

MACS 23 NCO trains fellow Marines to be martial arts instructors

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --Cpl Trent Wilcox, MACS 23 takes a quick rest. Most Marines who participate in advanced MCMAP training - especially the ones seeking their instructor tabs - are in excellent physical condition.(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Cpl. Trent Wilcox, Marine Air Control Squadron 23, takes a quick rest during a Marine Corps Martial Arts instructor trainer class recently. Most Marines who participate in advanced MCMAP training - especially the ones seeking their instructor tabs - are in excellent physical condition.(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --
Sgt Randall  Blankenship,Macs-23 crosses   a bar obstacle. The course test students physically and also mentally.(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Sgt. Randall Blankenship, MACS 23, crosses a bar obstacle. The course is designed to test students physically and mentally. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --
Sgt Randall  Blankenship,Macs-23 climbs over a wall while completing an obstacle course.Students volunteer themselves to go through the 3 week Marine Corps martial Arts Program course.(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Sgt Randall Blankenship, MACS 23, climbs over a wall while completing an obstacle course during the MCMAP intsructor trainer class recently.Students volunteer to go through the three-week course. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Joshua Tucker, Macs-23 gives a hand to Sgt Randall Blankenship, Macs-23. am building played a big part in the qualification course teamwork taught in MCMAC spills out into their daily duty situations as well.(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Joshua Tucker gives a hand to Sgt Randall Blankenship. Team building played a big in the MCMAP IT course. Marines who attended say the teamwork they learned spills out into their daily duty situationsl. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --Macs-23 Marines(left to right) Sgt Randall Blankenship, SSgt Albert Martinez, Cpl Charles Bays carries fellow Marines (left to right) Sgt. Dale S Steinecke, Cpl Trent Wilcox , Sgt Joshua Tucker as part of there Combat Skills training.Marine members take a three week Marine Corps Martial Arts Program course.(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- MACS 23 Marines carry fellow Marines during combat skills training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Macs 23 marines Cpl Charles Bays brawls with Cpl Trent Wilcox. Marine members take a three week Marine Corps Martial Arts Program course.(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- MACS 23 Marines Cpl. Charles Bays brawls with Cpl. Trent Wilcox during MCMAP training recently. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --Macs 23 marines Sgt Randall Blankenship, Cpl Charles Bays, Sgt Joshua Tucker,Sgt. Dale S Steinecke ascends up a hill. After completion of the MCMAP course the students are able to gain a different color belt according to there skill level.(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- MACS 23 Marines Sgt. Randall Blankenship, Cpl. Charles Bays, Sgt. Joshua Tucker, Sgt. Dale Steinecke run up a hill. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --SSgt Albert Martinez, Macs 23 observes  Sgt Randall Blankenship, Macs 23 and Cpl Trent Wilcox, Macs 23 engage each other in combat training. Students volunteer themselves to go through the 3 week Marine Corps martial Arts Program course.(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Staff Sgt. Albert Martinez, MACS 23, observes as Sgt. Randall Blankenship, Cpl. Trent Wilcox engage each other in combat training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --Sgt Joshua Tucker, MACS 23 strikes Cpl Charles Bays during MCMAP course.The course is designed to incorporate a "continuum of force" system that allows Marines to escalate to the correct level of force in situations ranging from hand-to-hand combat to crowd control.(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Sgt. Joshua Tucker, MACS 23, strikes Cpl. Charles Bays during MCMAP course. The course is designed to incorporate a "continuum of force" system that allows Marines to escalate to the correct level of force in situations ranging from hand-to-hand combat to crowd control. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Macs 23 Marines Sgt Randall Blankenship, Cpl Trent Wilcox, Cpl Charles Bays,
Sgt Dale S Steinecke carries SSgt Albert Martinez during a casualty exercise.
The MCMAP class is open to all military members who wish to take part but there most be approval from there commander.
(U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 10

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- MACS 23 Marines carry Staff Sgt. Albert Martinez during a casualty exercise. The MCMAP class is open to all military members who wish to take part but military members must get their commander's approval first. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Paul Labbe)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Blood, dirt, pain and pride ... the Marines are at it again.

No, it wasn't a stereotypical brawl that brought the Devil Dogs out to fight with everything they had in them, but a test of their mental, character and physical disciplines.

Those are the three disciplines of the three-week Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, the same disciplines Marine Sgt. David Claypool, a Marine Air Control Squadron 23 radio operator and MCMAP brown belt instructor trainer, pounded into the heads, bodies and souls of the Marines attempting to become instructors in the service's martial arts program here recently.

The Marines who attended the MCMAP course here asked for the opportunity to become instructors. MACS 23's newest MCMAC inructor trainers were selected from that group.

"We volunteered to get our asses kicked," said Marine Sgt. Dale Steinecke, a MACS 23 motor vehicle technician who was recently awarded the title of MCMAP green belt instructor trainer.

Martial arts have a long history in the Corps dating back to the creation of the Marines who incorporated martial abilities into boarding vessels at sea or in port. Since 2001, Marines have relied on MCMAP to give them the edge in lethal and non-lethal situations.

While the course does get rough physically, it was designed to incorporate a "continuum of force" system that allows Marines to escalate to the correct level of force in situations ranging from hand-to-hand combat to crowd control.

"You only use as much force as necessary to take control of the situation and gain a tactical advantage," Sergeant Claypool explained. "If you hit the guy and he falls over, you don't jump on him and keep going."

Marines also keep growing mentally by being tested in difficult situations that demand more than brute force to garner success, said Marine Staff Sgt. Albert Martinez, a MACS 23 radar operator and technician who was recently awarded the title of MCMAP green belt instructor trainer. He said that most Marines who participate in advanced MCMAP training - especially the ones seeking their instructor tabs - are in excellent physical condition, so by challenging them mentally they are forced to grow and overcome as a team.

Sergeant Steinecke said team building played a big part in the instructor qualification course. He said the teamwork taught in MCMAC spills out into their daily duty situations as well.

"Absolutely," he said. "I mean, regardless of what it is, for the most part you're gonna feel like if you work as a team, you're gonna be more efficient."

Claypool said the Marine Corps has no problem stripping someone of their certifications if they don't honor the core disciplines or get in some sort of trouble. He said the Marines he trained all know that and because they all strive for the opportunity to be an instructor trainer, he has faith in them and their behavior in any given situation.

"We're held to a higher standard by Marines, junior and senior, and we hold ourselves to a higher standard as well," said Sergeant Steinecke.

All Marines are required to get their gray belt and infantry members must get their green belts. The instructor course here helped the unit by increasing the capacity to train its members.

Sergeant Claypool, who has instructed members of every American military service as well as international military members and police, said the course is open to any Team Buckley military members, but that the person would need signed permission from their commander before they would be allowed to participate.

"If they come in and they join in as one of the students, then they're one of the students," said Sergeant Claypool. "It doesn't matter what branch, what rank, anything. None of that stuff matters once they're a student. When other units come in, we've gotta make sure both commands are on board."

While the next class date isn't set, anyone involved in MCMAP can expect more of the same - blood, dirt, pain and pride.
USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.